currants

Wednesday June 29, 2016

As a ten year old, I wanted to be Anne of Green Gables. I envied her red hair (auburn, she would protest), her impressive vocabulary, and her house with a real name. Moreover, I wished that when I got in trouble it made as entertaining a story as Anne’s escapades did!

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One of my favorite stories about Anne involved a tea party “with tragic results” (as the chapter title put it). Anne, thrilled to host her best friend Diana for the afternoon, served her guest a drink that both girls thought was raspberry cordial. Only after Diana became intoxicated, to her mother’s horror and Anne’s bewilderment, did the girls realize that the bottle had contained home-made currant wine instead.

Although it’s been years since I’ve laughed over Anne’s ill-fated tea party (and her charm and pluck in making things right), the story came to mind as we picked currants for tomorrow’s CSA share.

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These tiny, translucent red berries may be the prettiest crop we’ve harvested so far this year–in the sunshine, they almost glow as they dangle from the bushes’ spreading branches. Currants come in black and white varieties, in addition to red, and we have several black currant bushes growing along the street by the farm. Currants are related to the gooseberry, and are actually not related to the dried currants used in scones and fruitcakes.

Posted by Abigail Erlanson

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